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Strategic Management-Financial Statements And Strategies

Resource: Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains, Ch. 7

Read Case: The Pert Mustang (below).

Write a 1,050- to 1,400-word paper in which you address the following points:

  • Prepare the report that Vicky Roberts requested, assuming the project will begin immediately. Assume 45 working days are available to complete the project, including transporting the car to Detroit before the auto show begins.
  • Discuss, briefly, the aspects of the proposed new business, such as the competitive priorities that Roberts asked about.
  • Create a table containing the project activities used in the letter assigned to each activity, the time estimates, and the precedence relationships from which you will assemble the network diagram.
  • Draw a network diagram of the project similar to Figure 7.3.
  • Determine the activities on the critical path and the estimated slack for each activity.

 

CASE: The Pert Mustang

Roberts Auto Sales and Service (RASAS) consists of three car dealerships that sell and service several makes of American and Japanese cars, two auto parts stores, a large body shop and car painting business, and an auto salvage yard. Vicky Roberts, owner of RASAS, went into the car business when she inherited a Ford dealership from her father. She was able to capitalize on her knowledge and experience to build her business into the diversified and successful mini-empire it is today. Her motto, “Sell ‘em today, repair ‘em tomorrow!” reflects a strategy that she refers to in private as “Get ‘em coming and going.”Roberts has always retained a soft spot in her heart for high-performance Mustangs and just acquired a 1965 Shelby Mustang GT 350 that needs a lot of restoration. She also notes the public’s growing interest in the restoration of vintage automobiles. Roberts is thinking of expanding into the vintage car restoration business and needs help in assessing the feasibility of such a move. She wants to restore her 1965 Shelby Mustang to mint condition, or as close to mint condition as possible. If she decides to go into the car restoring business, she can use the Mustang as an exhibit in sales and advertising and take it to auto shows to attract business for the new shop.Roberts believes that many people want the thrill of restoring an old car themselves, but they do not have the time to run down all the old parts. Still, others just want to own a vintage auto because it is different and many of them have plenty of money to pay someone to restore an auto for them.Roberts wants the new business to appeal to both types of people. For the first group, she envisions serving as a parts broker for NOS (“new old stock”), new parts that were manufactured many years ago and are still packaged in their original cartons. It can be a time-consuming process to find the right part. RASAS could also machine new parts to replicate those that are hard to find or that no longer exist.In addition, RASAS could assemble a library of parts and body manuals for old cars to serve as an information resource for do-it-yourself restorers. The do-it-yourselfers could come to RASAS for help in compiling parts lists, and RASAS could acquire the parts for them. For others, RASAS would take charge of the entire restoration.Roberts asked the director of service operations to take a good look at her Mustang and determine what needs to be done to restore it to the condition it was in when it came from the factory more than 40 years ago. She wants to restore this car in time to exhibit it at the Detroit Auto Show. If the car gets a lot of press, it will be a real public relations coup for RASAS—especially if Roberts decides to enter this new venture. Even if she does not, the car will be a showpiece for the rest of the business.Roberts asked the director of service operations to prepare a report about what is involved in restoring the car and whether it can be done in time for the Detroit show in 45 working days using PERT/CPM. The parts manager, the body shop manager, and the chief mechanic have provided the following estimates of times and activities that need to be done, as well as cost estimates:

  • a. Order all needed material and parts (upholstery, windshield, carburetor, and oil pump). Time: 2 days. Cost (telephone calls and labor): $100.
  • b. Receive upholstery material for seat covers. Cannot be done until order is placed. Time: 30 days. Cost: $2,100.
  • c. Receive windshield. Cannot be done until order is placed. Time: 10 days. Cost: $800.
  • d. Receive carburetor and oil pump. Cannot be done until order is placed. Time: 7 days. Cost: $1,750.
  • e. Remove chrome from body. Can be done immediately. Time: 1 day. Cost: $200.
  • f. Remove body (doors, hood, trunk, and fenders) from frame. Cannot be done until chrome is removed. Time: 1 day. Cost: $300.
  • g. Have fenders repaired by body shop. Cannot be done until body is removed from frame. Time: 4 days. Cost: $1,000.
  • h. Repair doors, trunk, and hood. Cannot be done until body is removed from frame. Time: 6 days. Cost: $1,500.
  • i. Pull engine from chassis. Do after body is removed from frame. Time: 1 day. Cost: $200.
  • j. Remove rust from frame. Do after the engine has been pulled from the chassis. Time: 3 days. Cost $900.
  • k. Regrind engine valves. Do after the engine has been pulled from the chassis. Time: 5 days. Cost: $1,000.
  • l. Replace carburetor and oil pump. Do after engine has been pulled from chassis and after carburetor and oil pump have been received. Time: 1 day. Cost: $200.
  • m. Rechrome the chrome parts. Chrome must have been removed from the body first. Time: 3 days. Cost: $210.
  • n. Reinstall engine. Do after valves are reground and carburetor and oil pump have been installed. Time: 1 day. Cost: $200.
  • o. Put doors, hood, and trunk back on frame. The doors, hood, and trunk must have been repaired first. The frame must have had its rust removed first. Time: 1 day. Cost: $240.
  • p. Rebuild transmission and replace brakes. Do so after the engine has been reinstalled and the doors, hood, and trunk are back on the frame. Time: 4 days. Cost: $2,000.
  • q. Replace windshield. Windshield must have been received. Time: 1 day. Cost: $100.
  • r. Put fenders back on. The fenders must have been repaired first, the transmission rebuilt, and the brakes replaced. Time: 1 day. Cost: $100.
  • s. Paint car. Cannot be done until the fenders are back on and windshield replaced. Time: 4 days. Cost: $1,700.
  • t. Reupholster interior of car. Must have received upholstery material first. Car must have been painted first. Time: 7 days. Cost: $2,400.
  • u. Put chrome parts back on. Car must have been painted and chrome parts rechromed first. Time: 1 day. Cost: $100.
  • v. Pull car to the Detroit Auto Show. Must have completed reupholstery of interior and have put the chrome parts back on. Time: 2 days. Cost: $1,000.

Roberts wants to limit expenditures on this project to what could be recovered by selling the restored car. She has already spent $50,000 to acquire the car. In addition, she wants a brief report on some of the aspects of the proposed business, such as how it fits in with RASAS’s other businesses and what RASAS’s operations task should be with regard to cost, quality, customer service, and flexibility.In the restoration business there are various categories of restoration. A basic restoration gets the car looking great and running, but a mint-condition restoration puts the car back in original condition—as it was “when it rolled off the line.” When restored cars are resold, a car in mint condition commands a much higher price than one that is just a basic restoration. As cars are restored, they can also be customized. That is, something is put on the car that could not have been on the original. Roberts wants a mint-condition restoration for her Mustang without customization. (The proposed new business would accept any kind of restoration a customer wanted.)The total budget cannot exceed $70,000 including the $50,000 Roberts has already spent. In addition, Roberts cannot spend more than $3,600 in any week given her present financial position. Even though much of the work will be done by Roberts’s own employees, labor and materials costs must be considered. All relevant costs have been included in the cost estimates.

The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company: The Quest For Service Excellence

  1. What is Ritz-Carlton’s business strategy, e.g., who are their primary customers?
  2. Among consumers, what accounts for Ritz-Carlton’s reputation as a high-quality hotel? How is quality defined by customers?
  3. How is quality defined within Ritz-Carlton? Does the DQPR (Daily Quality Production Report) data in the ritz.xls spreadsheet indicate any significant quality problems?
  4. If you were to select a category of defect to address from the DQPR (Daily Quality Production Report) data, which category would you address first? Why?
    1. What is Ritz-Carlton’s business strategy, e.g., who are their primary customers?
    2. Among consumers, what accounts for Ritz-Carlton’s reputation as a high-quality hotel? How is quality defined by customers?
    3. How is quality defined within Ritz-Carlton? Does the DQPR (Daily Quality Production Report) data in the ritz.xls spreadsheet indicate any significant quality problems?
    4. If you were to select a category of defect to address from the DQPR (Daily Quality Production Report) data, which category would you address first? Why?
      1. What is Ritz-Carlton’s business strategy, e.g., who are their primary customers?
      2. Among consumers, what accounts for Ritz-Carlton’s reputation as a high-quality hotel? How is quality defined by customers?
      3. How is quality defined within Ritz-Carlton? Does the DQPR (Daily Quality Production Report) data in the ritz.xls spreadsheet indicate any significant quality problems?
      4. If you were to select a category of defect to address from the DQPR (Daily Quality Production Report) data, which category would you address first? Why?

Stakeholder Analysis Of Tesla Motors And The Global Automobile Industry

Discussion 1: Case Analysis With Discussion: Stakeholder Analysis of Tesla Motors and the Global Automobile Industry

To develop effective strategies, a business must thoroughly understand its ecosystem, and the stakeholders within it, that can affect its success. To this end, effective businesses often analyze the political, economic, social, and technological forces (sometimes called P.E.S.T. analysis) and perform a comprehensive stakeholder analysis. Businesses can use each analysis to survey opportunities for strategic action, as well as to evaluate threats to current resource capabilities and strategies.

This week, you use a large-scale, industry-level case study to analyze critical forces and stakeholder interests and needs that shape the ecosystem of an organization and industry. You then examine the strategic implications of the critical forces and stakeholder analyses concepts as they apply to your Capstone Strategy Playbook.

Stakeholder Analysis of Tesla Motors

P.E.S.T. analysis is an important way to capture the general forces that affect industries and companies. Another way to obtain a more comprehensive perspective of the general ecosystem that a company like Tesla Motors works within, is to identify, as explicitly as possible, all the stakeholders that have an interest in a given business.

You might want to think about this from the “outside-in.” That is, given each of the major P.E.S.T. forces noted above, ask yourself, “Who are the people (stakeholders) behind each major force and how must I relate to them strategically?” So, for example, it is clear that international and national political figures may be relevant stakeholders in any given case, as would government regulators at local, regional, national, or international levels. You can’t change a local, regional, or national/international regulation directly—you have to know who to see and the action occurs among people—so a stakeholder analysis is, in many ways, a “personified” version of your P.E.S.T. analysis.

To prepare for this Discussion:

· Review all required readings, including the Weekly Briefing, which provides additional guidance on how to complete the Assignment.

· Review this week’s case study. You can, and should, scan it multiple times.

· Identify and review all relevant readings from the MBA Program Capstone Bibliography.

· Consider the elements of P.E.S.T. analysis that you learned earlier in the MBA program. These elements include:

· Political (Legislative) and Legal Elements (regulatory environment, market access, technology regulation, zoning restrictions, industry specific, company specific legislation, anti-trust laws, insurance/liability requirements, safety regulations, child workforce protection laws, immigration laws, etc.)

· Economic Elements (interest rate and equity market movements, capital liquidity, inflation prospects, exchange rate movements, workforce availability, discretionary income levels, etc.)

· Societal Values and Ethics (risk taking propensity, family dynamics and behavior, cultural “in” behaviors, taboo activities, media focus, religious behaviors, ethical limitations on business, etc.)

· Technology Elements (materials technology advances, electronics advances, communications advances, infrastructure access [communication, electricity, etc.], energy advances, etc.)  And an important and too often forgotten element:

· Demographic Changes (age distribution and trend, absolute population size and trend, birth and death rates, gender proportion and trend, ethnic mix and trend, location/mobility and trends.)

· Identify, as explicitly as possible, all the relevant stakeholders that have an interest in Tesla Motors, and how Tesla should manage them as part of a strategy.

· Research your stakeholder list initially this way, to ensure complete coverage:

· General Ecosystem Stakeholders (the ones that are behind the specific P.E.S.T. influences, includes the press, interest groups, the public at large, communities, shareholders, etc.)

· Industry Level Stakeholders (direct local competitors, potential substitute companies, other competitors or potential competitors outside your current markets, lenders, alliance or potential alliance partners, trade associations, suppliers in the entire supply chain, customers and their end-users, potential customers or end users, etc.)

· Internal Stakeholders (these are the people who influence the company from inside, including the board of directors, senior leadership, management, skilled employees at any level, other employees, contract workforce, outsourced workforce, potential new recruits, etc.)

· Potential New Stakeholders (at any level, but which may become stakeholders as you consider new strategic actions and activities)

· Then, reorder and rank the stakeholder list in order of “influence priority,” where stakeholders at the top of the prioritized list require more of Tesla Motor’s attention because they can/will influence your strategic choices for the future the most.

By Day 3

Post an assessment of the stakeholder environment for Tesla (and the U.S. automobile industry) that includes a comprehensive and prioritized list of stakeholders and explains who the key stakeholders are that Tesla Motors must pay attention to and why; and then offers specific strategies for how Tesla must seek to manage or otherwise, legally and ethically, influence these stakeholders.

General Guidance: Your original post, due by Day 3, will typically be approximately 1 single-spaced page in length (cut and pasted into the Discussion) as a general expectation/estimate.

 

Refer to the Week 4 Discussion 1 rubric for grading elements and criteria. Your Instructor will use the rubric to assess your work.

One Page Paper On SWOT Analysis

This week’s Assignment consists of envisioning a business idea and submitting a one page minimum paper in which you identify the business including its mission, vision, primary product or service, and describe a SWOT analysis relative to its planned expansion. In this Assignment on creating a business SWOT analysis, you will engage in developing the following professional competencies: ● Problem solving and critical thinking by analyzing qualitative data in decision making. You are the owner and CEO of a business. Your business has eight locations. Each location has a location manager (who is the middle manager), a supervisor (who is the frontline level manager), and four employees. Your strategic goal for the business over the next five years is to expand into another geographic region and to increase the number and types of products or services your business provides. Choose a product or service that you would like your business to primarily provide. Compose a paper that begins by identifying the business type, stating your primary vision and mission for this business, and briefly describe (in one paragraph or less) the product or service your business provides to its customers. Then, referring to your assigned readings and other classroom preparatory materials regarding SWOT analysis, type a paper of at least one full double-spaced page, describing at least one potential strength, one potential weakness, one potential opportunity, and one potential threat that could influence or affect your strategic goal of expanding your business over the next five years. Write your Assignment in paragraph form, using Microsoft® Word®. Your document should be at least 1 double-spaced page in length, using size 12-point type size. This Assignment should be free of spelling and punctuation errors. Submission Instructions: Draft your Assignment paper at least 1 double-spaced page in length, using size 12 point font in MS Word format. Be sure your paper is well written in paragraph form, with correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Be sure to name your file according to the Kaplan file-naming convention.

Lessons Learned From The Project Management Simulation

Work as Individuals to do the ‘Project Management’ Simulation. Written Hand-In: Topic: Lessons Learned from the Project Management Simulation.

Individual Written Hand-In #1B:  Limit: 1 Page+ Exhibits max.

 

 

I already run the simulation and I did it.

I want youjust to write one page about the lessons learned from that simulation and focuse on:

 

SCORING

Senior management at Delphi is looking closely at how you perform while managing this effort. The specific breakdown will be listed under Project Objectives. You will be graded on these areas:

·         Project Scope: Did you deliver a competitive printer that met or exceeded senior management’s expectations?

·         Project Schedule: Did you deliver on time to meet senior management’s schedule requirements? Was your schedule estimate consistent during the project?

·         Project Resources: Did you complete the project within senior management’s budget objective?

In addition, you will receive points for maintaining a consistently high level of morale and a low level of stress throughout the project.

Description

The second release of this simulation adds a new scenario with multiple unanticipated events and the ability to add prototypes to the project plan. In this single-player simulation, students take on the role of a senior project manager and manage a team tasked with developing a new product for an electronics manufacturing company. The primary objectives are to execute a project plan successfully and deliver a competitive product on time and on budget. Instructors can assign up to 6 scenarios that expose students to realistic challenges that project managers often face, especially when working in a highly competitive industry. Some challenges require students to react to unanticipated outside events, such as a staffing crisis, while others require students to respond to strategic changes mandated by upper management. A new project lever for specifying prototypes allows students to explore the benefits of this essential component of agile project management.

Learning objective:

Explore trade-offs among the 3 major project management levers: scope, resources, and schedule. Understand how team skill level, team morale, deadlines, and work quality are interrelated and affected by a project manager’s decisions. Analyze the effect of poor-quality work on project outcomes. Understand the importance of appropriately timed changes in allocating resources. React to unanticipated events and managing uncertainty. Set realistic project objectives and minimize scope changes.

Subjects Covered:

Budgets; Leading teams; Managing people; Project management; Prototypes; Resources

 


I attached files just to have clear idea about the simulation